The Fugitive!

Cypri

 

 

 

 

There is a fugitive among us artists….and it’s apparently Alizarin Crimson!  It has always been one of my favorite colors to use but it can be a precarious character in painting.  There is, however, a heroine to this story and her name Permanent Alizarin Crimson…I know…not necessarily the most creative name to be given to a heroine.  She is a rather reliable substitute, as seen in Cypri above, to create that rich garnet red. In doing some research about the color that I love so much, I discovered a blog post by Jay Babina on the Artist Daily website.  He contacted Utrecht (before they were Blick) and received the following sensible explanation from Matthew Kinsey, the “Ask the Experts” representative:

Alizarin Crimson is the synthetic version of one component of the traditional vegetable-derived color Madder. (The other, more fugitive component, Purpurin, gives madder a unique hue that is distinctly different from Alizarin.) While Alizarin is still considered by our industry permanent to the standards of durable, professional painting, it is the least lightfast color still in the modern palette. How quickly it may fade would depend on how it is used on the palette and how the resulting artwork is displayed and cared for. Mixing fugitive colors directly with white to produce tints will speed up fading compared to using it full strength or in glazing over mid-tones and darks. Paintings displayed in full sun or under unshielded halogen lamps can fade more quickly than if they are protected from harsh UV light.

Permanent Alizarin Crimson is not directly related to Madder. It’s a different proprietary formula depending on the manufacturer, but most use a quinacridone or other synthetic organic pigment to simulate the appearance of the traditional color. With some adjustment it’s an excellent replacement for artists who are most concerned with permanence. 

The art materials industry has gone to a lot of effort to make consumers aware of issues of permanence so today it’s possible for artists to decide for themselves which option to select, based on individual skill, pictorial objectives and aversion to risk of fading.  Paint manufacturers still offer genuine Alizarin Crimson because there is great demand among artists for this unique color that’s present on so many historical works of art. Despite being relatively less permanent than other colors, we feel with good craftsmanship on the part of the artist and proper care on the part of collectors, Alizarin Crimson still deserves its place in the modern painter’s kit. 

Winsor Newton has also provided some additional information on “The importance of being permanent” which can be found here! Winsor Newton provides ratings of permanence on their pigments as I am sure other reputable paint providers do. I believe as a collector of art, it is important that you make sure the artists you collect respect the materials so that the artwork you are paying your hard earned money on will last you generation after generation. 

 

What I have learned about Plein Air….

Plein Air Painter

I am unabashedly a studio painter.  Oh sure, occasionally in the summer months I set up an easel system in my garage and paint.  In my old neighborhood the kids would sneak over, filled with curiosity as to what Mrs. Barron was up to in her garage with the music blaring.  But that was about as close to Plein Air as I have ever gotten.  Now I am living where there is a major Plein Air Competition held by the Cedarburg Artists Guild (www.cedarburgartistsguild.com) every year.

I love my intimate environment with my canvas and paints.  It is important for me to build a relationship with my subject matter.  So I was rather perplexed trying to figure out how to be involved, enjoy the weather (when it was nice this past week), and meet other artists now that it’s no longer too cold to be out and about.  While at a Guild meeting I realized that I could use my time to walk around, meet some of the artists who have come here to participate, and do some interviewing with photos to share with all those who are friends of the guild’s Facebook page.  During this time I have benefitted more than I thought I would.

I have met some amazing artists and seen how they treat their canvases for outdoor painting.  I have seen many different ground colors used.  In fact, one artist used a very bright green undertone which he felt would be difficult to paint over but halfway through the painting he discovered that bright lime tone gave such inner light to his landscape.   We have shared discussions on numbers of brushes to bring, use, and the challenges with whichever they have decided.  However, I believe the most important lesson to be learned from plein air painting is the need to make quick decisions as the light changes so rapidly.  As an artist we forget to use our instincts and I believe plein air painting encourages us to push our talents to the top without allowing our safety devices to get in the way.  A lesson that I hope will stay with me forever.

Most artists have enjoyed the conversations by passerby people walking down the sidewalks and have been so gracious to allow me to invade their space with my pad, pen, camera, and questions.  I’d like to thank them all for their time!

Even though I didn’t paint this year in the competition, I do believe I came out a winner for having met those that I have talked to and for learning all that I have which will provide me that additional courage to participate fully next year.  If you are in the Cedarburg, Wisconsin area I hope you’ll come on out for Strawberry Festival on Saturday and head over to the Cedarburg Cultural Center (www.cedarburgculturalcenter.org) to see the plein air paintings and perhaps bid on one in the auction that begins at 4:30pm.

Hope to see you there!